How to Be Thankful in a Ruined Thanksgiving

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It was Thanksgiving Eve in 2004, and I was driving the thirty-minute drive home from work. Snowflakes started to flutter as I drove through town. By the time I made it to the highway, I could barely see in front of me. And I still had to drive through my small mid-western town and country roads.

sandra-frey-336993With dropping temperatures, snow, and now wind blowing the snow and increasing rain, we’d not have electricity at home for Thanksgiving meal. I called home on my cell.

No answer. Bummer.

Phone lines were down.

What usually took eight minutes to get through town and countryside too nearly thirty minutes. Slippery roads. One steering wheel jerk and I’d go flying or rolling through the bean field.

Much prayer later, I arrived home to discover no electricity. Well. That’s fine. We’ll eat bread and butter for Thanksgiving meal and really give thanks.

The feast that had been so rudely interrupted by the ice storm had to be covered up and set outside because it would spoil in the fridge with no electricity to preserve it.

thanksgiving-table-tisha-martin-author-editor-annie-spratt-215756My family scrounged the cabinets for something simple to throw together. We match-lit the stove and prepared a meal fit for a pauper: corn, rolls, green beans, mashed potatoes. Dad braved the elements and deep-fried the turkey.

Simplicity that year turned out to be the best Thanksgiving memory.

As a family, we huddled with blankets around our Thanksgiving table, lit by Grandpa’s grandpa oil lamp tisha martin author editor thanksgiving 2004kerosene lanterns. We thanked the Lord we had a house, our lives, and good food to eat. We laughed and joked about the weather and wondered how long we’d be snowed in, and who we’d see at the restaurant or grocery store in town when this storm finally blew over and we’d be able to travel again.

God wants us to find peace in the simplicity of life. Even if it meant freezing while thanking.

4 thoughts on “How to Be Thankful in a Ruined Thanksgiving

  1. I remember 2008. It was the year I had to melt snow and ice on my back porch with the barbeque so the horses could have water! Also the year I broke both of the lower bones in my left leg walking home from the post office. Fun times!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. We had Christmas with no power. Ice storms had knocked out the power in much of the area. Thankfully we had a wood stove in the family room, the only room in the rental house that stayed warm. We ate stewed vegetables. I don’t remember what else we had. But I do remember we sang Christmas carols together that night, in front of the wood stove, by candlelight!

    Like

    1. Carrie,
      Wood stoves are so useful when the power goes out. What a great memory that’s with you forever. You may never eat stewed vegetables again without feeling the warmth of that wood stove and hearing those family carols float through the air.

      Like

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